Blog Archives

Louvre on the Move

By Quinn Cartelli The Louvre was built in the 12th century by King Philippe Augustus as a defensive fortress to protect his city, Paris, from invaders. Expansion of the city beyond its original borders prompted the King to make architectural changes

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What You Should Know About the Rohingya Genocide

By Elizabeth Zimmer As of November 2017, the catastrophic Myanmar genocide has the potential to become the “most significant humanitarian catastrophe” since the Rwandan genocide in the 1990s. For members of the general public, this might come as a surprise.

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Turmoil in Spain: Is This the Birth of a New State?

By Eugene Mok On Friday, October 27, 2017, the autonomous Generalitat of Catalonia officially announced its independence from Spain. The Catalan parliament voted in favor of secession, while the Spanish parliament directly opposed such decision by approving the Spanish Prime

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Google’s Antitrust Problem

By John Underhill American companies have found it much more difficult to freely conduct business in Europe as compared to the U.S. Google is a prime example of this phenomena. The European Commission, which is the EU’s Antitrust regulator, has

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President Trump Refuses To Certify Iran Nuclear Deal: Signatories Prepare For Renegotiation Of Terms

By Brittany Dierken Barack Obama’s single most important foreign policy achievement is now being ripped apart by President Donald Trump. President Trump threatens to pull the U.S. out of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (referred to as the Iran

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TfL Drives Uber Out of London

By Gerald Bannon In 2012, just before the Olympics arrived in London, England, Uber received a private-hire license to run its ride-hailing operation in and around the city. In the five years since, to say that Uber has faced its

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The Rohingya and International Laws of Ethnic Cleansing

By Zachary Perdek The Rohignya have been described as “the world’s most persecuted minority.” They are an ethic group of about 1.1 million who have lived in Myanmar for centuries. They speak a distinct dialect, are majority Muslim, are not

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Russian Response: a Tit for Tat

By Sean Assad In response to the prospect of increased economic sanctions from the US, Russia has ordered the US to cut their diplomatic staff by 755. In addition, Russia has said that it will block access to two American diplomatic

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Another Country joins the fray in the South China Sea

By Sean Assad The South China Sea is an important and strategic area as well as one of the most tense areas of the world. It sees $5 trillion in shipborne trade every year, and also has major fishing and energy

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